040: Ohio Drug Price Relief Act with Antonio Ciaccia & Jeff Bartone

About this Episode

In the fall of 2017, a complicated and important ballot makes its way onto the Ohio voting ballot. The proposed bill’s name:

The Ohio Drug Price Relief Act

Antonio Ciaccia, Jeff Bartone, Scott McGohan and Anne Marie Singleton sitting inside podcast studio
Antonio Ciaccia (far right) and Jeff Bartone join Scott McGohan and Anne Marie Singleton inside the Side Affects Studio in Dayton, Ohio.
Last November, the state of California spent an estimated $119 million to defeat the legislation known as “California Proposition 61“.
Now, The Ohio Drug Price Relief Act makes its way to Ohio. The bill, initiated by a California group headed by Michael Weinstein, is expected to cost Ohio $60 million in ad spending.

What is the Ohio Drug Pricing Relief Act

The Ohio Drug Pricing Relief Act aims to provide government agencies will not be charged a higher amount for prescription drugs than the Veteran’s Affair.
Essentially, the bill provides discounted price for prescription drugs to a select few.
President of the Ohio Pharmacy Association, Antonio Ciaccia argues that the bill does not actually lower prices, but instead cost shifts to employers and consumers.
The owner of Hock’s Pharmacy in Ohio, Jeff Bartone shares similar insight

Antonio Ciaccia, Jeff Bartone, Scott McGohan and Anne Marie Singleton sitting inside podcast studioas Ciaccia. Bartone notes that the Ohio Drug Pricing Act will cause pharmacies hundreds of millions of dollars in losses for prescription drugs that are used by the select few receiving the discount.

Those not receiving the discount will face price hikes, as large pharmaceutical industries are going to find ways to maintain profits.
For independently owned pharmacies such as Hock’s Pharmacy. The money lost on prescription drug discounts will potentially be recouped on other products in such stores.

The Confusion

Although the Ohio Drug Relief Act passing would be costly to Ohioans, there is still much confusion on which way to vote.
For consumers, the ads they’re seeing on TV are being run by pharmaceutical companies. The majority of individuals see these commercials and are under the belief that if a pharmaceutical company is running the ad then they should vote for the opposite.
This is quite the opposite of what they should do, argues Side Affects’ guests, Antonio Ciaccia and Jeff Bartone.
If you are looking for a detailed look at the Ohio Drug Relief Act and the possible ramifications of the bill passing, you do not want to miss this important episode of Side Affects.

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About our Guests

Antonio Ciaccia

Antonio Ciaccia is the Director of Government and Public Affairs at Ohio Pharmacists Association. He has currently served in this role for seven years.

His organization represents 3,500 members along with 16,000 licensed pharmacists in Ohio.

To learn more about Antonio Ciaccia and the Ohio Pharmacists Association, head over to their website ohiopharmacists.org.

Jeff Bartone

Jeff Bartone is the owner of Hock’s Pharmacy, headquartered in Tipp City, Ohio. During

Antonio Ciaccia, Jeff Bartone, Scott McGohan and Anne Marie Singleton
Jeff Bartone (far right) with Antonio Ciaccia behind-the-scenes of McGohan Brabender with Scott McGohan and Anne Marie Singleton.

his time as the Hock’s Pharmacy owner, he has implemented various promotions that

help consumers save money on prescription medication.

His passion and drive to better the community around him has led him to become an active participant in pharmacy legislation.

He has served as the second youngest President of the Ohio Pharmacist Association.

You can learn more about Jeff Bartone and Hock’s Pharmacy on their website hocksrx.com

Notes and Resources

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